Cooperative learning

 

  1. Teams-Games-Tournament cooperative game model – this would be effective especially in reviews before tests. . ” Specifically, this study adopted Teams-Games-Tournament, a well-established cooperative learning strategy (Slavin 1995), as the cooperative goal structure technique. Based on the TGT model, students formed heterogeneous 3–4 person teams (mixed in ability and gender). At the beginning of each game session, students collaborated with teammates for 15 min by sitting before a single computer and practicing with the games. For the remainder of the 30 min, game teams then competed with one another: each team member was assigned to a desktop computer at a tournament table to play against other teams’ representatives. At any tournament table the students were roughly comparable in achievement level. At the end of every gaming session, the players at each table compared their gaming scores to determine their rank which was then converted into points. The points that the players earned added up to a team’s score. The team scores were ranked and listed in a class newsletter, and distributed to the class at the beginning of the next treatment session. The top team received a winner’s certificate. TGT was selected because it is a cooperative technique using both group rewards and individual accountability (Slavin 1995). Researchers (Johnson and Johnson 1996 ; Slavin 1995) stated that cooperative learning has its greatest effect on student learning when group rewards and individual accountability exist. In addition, TGT has been applied in empirical game-based learning research and produced positive outcomes (Tanner and Lindquist 1998).”

    Ke, F. (2008). Computer games application within alternative classroom goal structures: cognitive, metacognitive and affective evaluation. Educational Technology Research and Development, 56 (5-6) 539-556

  2. Allow more cooperative work – like in building their game in Kodu in Digital Tech – “Cooperative goal structure, as opposed to the other two structures, significantly enhances the effects of computer games on learning motivation.” Ke, F. (2008). Computer games application within alternative classroom goal structures: cognitive, metacognitive and affective evaluation. Educational Technology Research and Development, 56 (5-6) 539-556

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